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  • Broke Disc

    I did the spring maintenance on the '83 FLHTC with Rig and took it to town to fill with fresh gas. On the way there it felt like the brake was dragging. Got home and the rear brake was so tight that I couldn't push the rig. I let it cool overnight and went to investigate this morning. After doing a fluid flush and making sure everything was working right I was cleaning the disc and turned the wheel to find that the disc had obviously got hot enough to break from the outer edge to one of the big holes near the axle. Luckily I had a spare and will finish replacing it tomorrow. I had never seen this before and I won't let it happen again.

  • #2
    Was it stainless steel or an iron one.
    sigpic

    "I miss the good old days. Things were more like they used to be back then".

    '58 Pan kick only jockey shift. '82 Shovel custom (built from parts). & a '75 Ironhead basket case.

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    • #3
      ...never happen on a Jap bike! LOL
      Welcome to owning a piece of America. A small price to pay to enjoy riding something so kewl that it makes people tattoo it on themselves!
      My Website: www.amcpchoppers.com

      sigpic:

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      • #4
        not sure if this was your problem,
        but I've read (& experienced) that moisture (water) in the hydraulic fluid gets hot, expands, & causes the brake to drag, to the point that the wheel can lock up.
        A sticking piston in a caliper may do the same.(piston will push against pad, but doesn't retract..)
        .Been trying to get a stuck piston out of a XL-600 (dirtbike) caliper for a few months now.
        rochester Hills, Mi

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Joespeed View Post
          not sure if this was your problem,
          but I've read (& experienced) that moisture (water) in the hydraulic fluid gets hot, expands, & causes the brake to drag, to the point that the wheel can lock up.
          A sticking piston in a caliper may do the same.(piston will push against pad, but doesn't retract..)
          .Been trying to get a stuck piston out of a XL-600 (dirtbike) caliper for a few months now.
          You should be able to assemble that caliper, put spacers or clamps on the pucks that aren't stuck, and push the piston out hydraulically.

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          • #6
            If the Master Cylinder plunger is not allowed to retract fully, this will be the result every time..

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            • #7
              "Was it stainless steel or an iron one."

              It was OEM so probably iron. I run DOT 5 in this but the idea of water condensing may be a rational explanation. The flush with fresh fluid should settle the problem. I hardly ever ride this thing. I call it the RV but it is more of a wife/grandkid Sunday jaunt type thing. 36 years old and just over 20,000 miles.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Joespeed View Post
                (deleted)
                A sticking piston in a caliper may do the same.(piston will push against pad, but doesn't retract..) (deleted)
                Another issue is that the "rubber" brake line can deteriorate on the inside, while the exterior still looks good. The deteriorated inside clogs the brake line, so that the master cylinder can still push brake fluid to the caliper (so the vehicle will still stop). The problem is that the caliper isn't strong enough to push the brake fluid back to the master cylinder, so the brake stay's "on", and it either keeps the wheel "locked up", or it (the brake) just drags and overheats.

                Had this happen to a Chevy truck once. Didn't discover the issue was with the brake line, until after I replaced the caliper.

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                • #9
                  Funny you should post this,bikeless4now, as your post reminded me of the exact same thing happened on my '98 Ford F-150 a few yrs.ago.
                  Had a mechanic friend do a brake job & the passenger side, front wheel started dragging, & locked up, on the drive home. Called the shop, & my mechanic came & picked up truck on a flat bed..(was only a few miles from the shop) Turned out the brake line was the problem..outside rubber looked fine, but the line had cracked inside & while it allowed fluid to go toward the piston, the rubber flap occluded the fluid from returning, which held the piston against the pad & rotor, making the brake drag..then lock as it heated up..
                  rochester Hills, Mi

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Joespeed View Post
                    Funny you should post this,bikeless4now, as your post reminded me of the exact same thing happened on my '98 Ford F-150 a few yrs.ago.
                    Had a mechanic friend do a brake job & the passenger side, front wheel started dragging, & locked up, on the drive home.(deleted)..
                    The Chevy had the issue on the right (passenger side) front also. Just to be safe we replaced the rubber hoses on both front brakes, and the single rubber brake hose going to the rear axle. Figured if one was old enough to fail, it was just a matter of time before the others did also.

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                    • #11
                      I have a steel line going from M/c back to rear wheels..2 yrs. ago, one line ruptured while I was on a short trip..
                      luckily, a brake shop in a small town I was passing thru was dead slow (had no work to do), so I got my line replaced right away..after they bent a new one.
                      rochester Hills, Mi

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Joespeed View Post
                        I have a steel line going from M/c back to rear wheels..2 yrs. ago, one line ruptured while I was on a short trip..
                        luckily, a brake shop in a small town I was passing thru was dead slow (had no work to do), so I got my line replaced right away..after they bent a new one.
                        That happened to my 98 exploder last year. The line was rusted, then busted, during a fast slowdown at 70 mph. Good thing there was a median to quickly swerve into.
                        Greg
                        84fxsb
                        the "Atomic City", oHIo

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                        • #13
                          you'd think from a safety standpoint, they'd use ss lines..(or that feds would require them)
                          I know they use ss in the exhaust system (sometimes)
                          rochester Hills, Mi

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