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  • Brake shoe lining

    I am putting new brake linings on my mechanical rear drum brake, and decided to round them off in the lathe, once fitted.
    So my question is, how much smaller then the ID of the drum should I aim for?
    Drum has also been rounded off in the lathe.

  • #2
    Nooooo....
    Rounding the drum is fine (don't take off too much) but not the shoes. Put them on and spin the wheel a few times stopping it with the brake. Pull it apart and file the spots where it was touching a little. Repeat until it contacts all the way around...
    My Website: www.amcpchoppers.com

    sigpic:

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    • #3
      Alright, I will do that instead. Thanks

      Just out of curiosity, why is rounding the shoes in the lathe a bad idea? I assume it would leave a smooth, even surface, that could match the drum.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by henriksonne View Post
        Alright, I will do that instead. Thanks

        Just out of curiosity, why is rounding the shoes in the lathe a bad idea? I assume it would leave a smooth, even surface, that could match the drum.
        Because the drum brake is Not applied radially... ie it does Not expand from the middle... it expands from the End... Look at how it Functions

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        • #5
          Someone here, maybe Vern, CRS, taped sandpaper on his drum to remove excess lining to get a better contact.
          I thought tha that sounded like a good, home school way of doing it.
          Don't build no shit and there won't be no shit
          "It's not me, it's the assholes I run with"
          Let me out of my way
          1984 FLH King OF THE HIGHWAY

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          • #6
            Originally posted by racerjim0 View Post
            Someone here, maybe Vern, CRS, taped sandpaper on his drum to remove excess lining to get a better contact.
            I thought tha that sounded like a good, home school way of doing it.

            I have heard of people doing that but it is a bad idea. It will embed sand in the brake lining which will accelerate the wear on the drum...
            My Website: www.amcpchoppers.com

            sigpic:

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            • #7
              Old time clutch & brake shops would grind brake shoes to match the drum. It works really well, and is a service that is all but lost to history.

              You can try it, but you must have a way of holding the brake shoe in the orientation it will see in the drum. With a fixed anchor brake, like the HD unit, that won't be easy. Hint, you will take more material off of the shoe toward the wheel cylinder. Probably nothing at the anchor end.

              Jim
              High Point, NC

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JB in NC View Post
                Old time clutch & brake shops would grind brake shoes to match the drum. It works really well, and is a service that is all but lost to history.

                You can try it, but you must have a way of holding the brake shoe in the orientation it will see in the drum. With a fixed anchor brake, like the HD unit, that won't be easy. Hint, you will take more material off of the shoe toward the wheel cylinder. Probably nothing at the anchor end.

                Jim
                It was called arching back in the day. Howie
                don't forget to remember

                Life is like a roll of toilet paper,--The closer you get to the end the faster it goes!

                The Prowler

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                • #9
                  I've gone to a few vintage car races the past 2 years and guys in the pits running drums are doing this by hand filing with the shoe in a vise. All of them just had files and eyeballing it looked like. I saw all of them doing it. I think it's file here, file there, reinstall, give the drum a whirl, remove and repeat... I figured since they all did the same thing it must be working. I never paid attention to that much detail when I did brakes on drums back in the 70's & 80's.

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                  • #10
                    Racetech arcs brake shoes. It's pricey at $200/drum.

                    https://www.racetech.com/page/title/Brake%20Arcing

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                    • #11
                      Thank you guys for all the answer.
                      I have a lead on an brake shop in my area, that will fit the shoes to the drum, so I will go with that solution.

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