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those needle bearings in pan 4 speed,s

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  • those needle bearings in pan 4 speed,s

    im going thru my gearbox, got it all apart, i will need the usual, i did notice that those loose needle bearings on both shafts, to me did not look correct, the dia was fine, .125, the length should be .615, out of the 88 needle,s there was only a small amount that were correct length some longer, some shorter, .007 difference from shortest to longest, the needles them selves, also, where they run on the shaft,s look good, am i wrong to think that the last rebuilder purchased these needles in sets, and the quality is that far off. odd thing if comparing the ends, no sign of any rubbing or digging into the thrust washers ect. i cant see quality control being this bad, or is it i dont know. thanks

  • #2
    Somebody fucked up somewhere - I'd just replace them all with new .615 rollers...

    1974 FLH

    1998 XLH1200 street tracker

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    • #3
      Originally posted by welder View Post
      ...i cant see quality control being this bad, or is it i dont know. thanks...
      Any more; yes, it can be that bad. I'd look at oem, or Andrews...and if Vtwin offers them, don't even consider them.

      Not what you expect from this forum
      Forum fucktard
      Winner of the Asshole thread...

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      • #4
        Jesus Christ. Seven thou difference in length is nothing. The main thing is, are they all .1250 in diameter, or do they vary? And did you mix them up, or have you kept the sets separate in their original positions? If you have kept the sets separate, I would not be averse to reusing them.

        Keep in mind that many replacement rollers currently available are not .1250 diameter. That's a problem.

        Good luck with it.

        Jim
        High Point, NC

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        • #5
          well i'm glad to know length dont matter !!!!!!!!!!!! enough of that juvenile talk, definitly look towards eastern or anything but tedds, just for fun i a used the micrometer to measure a bunch i had in different packs and there was a difference

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Al View Post
            Somebody fucked up somewhere - I'd just replace them all with new .615 rollers...
            i agree,, Al, from other responses, my thinking is , if a part is made, then sold on the premise that it meets certain specs, well, then it should. i have no issues with reusing these, if they spec out ok, width wise. Measuring to see if length is an issue was not a concern,plenty of room for them either way. just wanting to know if this a common practice, looks like it is. thanks

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            • #7
              Originally posted by welder View Post

              i agree,, Al, from other responses, my thinking is , if a part is made, then sold on the premise that it meets certain specs, well, then it should. i have no issues with reusing these, if they spec out ok, width wise. Measuring to see if length is an issue was not a concern,plenty of room for them either way. just wanting to know if this a common practice, looks like it is. thanks
              There are tolerances in every manufacturing step for every product under the sun. Those tolerances fall into several categories depending on the product and sometimes the manufacturing technique. All this also changes over time as manufacturing gets more sophisticated. Fifty years ago, the tolerance for a three decimal point dimension would be plus or minus five for many companies, unless a tighter tolerance was specified. For instance, the .615 length dimension for your roller might be an unspecified plus or minus .005. And the diameter of .1250 might be plus zero, minus .00005. (Just a guess on my part as an example. In checking hundreds of rollers my experience tells me the actual tolerance could be more like plus or minus .000075 on a roller sized in .0002 increments.)

              It's good that you are looking that closely at these parts, as long as you pay attention to the really important things, in this case variations in diameter.

              Jim
              High Point, NC

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